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Highlands | Nursing & Rehabilitation

Latest News

Latest News

Visiting Friends and Family with Higher Risk for Severe Illness

July 10, 2020
When you visit friends & family who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19, take these important steps. Wear cloth face coverings, stay at least 6 feet apart, meet outside if possible, wash your hands often, & sanitize all touched surfaces.

Cleaning and Disinfecting

June 26, 2020

When cleaning and disinfecting a public space, workplace, business, school or even your home, you have to put together a plan. Cleaning with soap and water removes germs, dirt, and impurities from surfaces while disinfecting actually kills the germs on surfaces. Cleaning lowers the risk of spreading infection, but disinfecting can even further lower that risk. Once you have a plan in place, you must implement then maintain and revise.

Develop Your Plan

  • Determine what needs to be cleaned
  • Determine how areas will be disinfected
  • Consider the resources and equipment needed

Consider the type of surface and how often the surface is touched. Prioritize disinfecting frequently touched surfaces and be mindful of the availability of products needed and PPE.

Implement the Plan

  • Clean visibly dirty surfaces with soap and water prior to disinfection
  • Use the appropriate cleaning or disinfecting product
  • Always follow the directions on the label

Maintain and Revise the Plan

  • Continue routine cleaning and disinfection
  • Maintain safe practices
  • Continue practices that reduce the potential for exposure

Continue to revise and improve upon your plan based on the appropriate disinfectant and PPE availability. Frequently wash your hands, use cloth face coverings and stay home while you are sick.


Content Source: The Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Fabric Face Coverings

June 12, 2020

Covid-19 has been found to spread mainly from person to person via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. Studies show that these droplets can usually travel around 6 feet and can land in the mouths or noses of people who are within that distance and possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Wearing a cloth face covering may not protect the wearer directly, but it may keep the wearer from spreading the virus to others. The Center for Disease Control recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.

Examples of those settings include:
• Grocery stores
• Pharmacies
• Gas stations
• Post Office
• Bank


Cloth face coverings are encouraged because they will slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus (and don’t know it yet) from transmitting it to others.

How to wear your face covering correctly:
• Wash your hands before putting on your cloth face covering
• Wear it over your nose and mouth and secure it under your chin
• Try to fit the cover snuggly against the sides of your face
• Make sure you can breathe easily


Wearing face coverings is a way to protect those around you. It is encouraged to be worn so you do not transmit the virus to others if you have it and are not presenting symptoms yet; though there are things to keep in mind for your own safety in removing the covering properly.

Examples include:
• Don’t put the covering around your neck or up on your forehead
• Do not touch the face covering, and if you do, wash or sanitize your hands afterwards
• Keep the covering on your face the entire time you’re in public
• Handle only by the ear loops
• Fold outside corners in together
• After removing, do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth, and wash your hands immediately after removing



Our care team members are required to wear medical grade masks at all times while in our communities. Cloth face coverings are encouraged outside of medical facilities and should only be worn in situations like the ones listed above.

Stress During Covid-19

May 30, 2020

Per the Center for Disease Control, the outbreak of Covid-19 may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in those affected.


Stress during an infectious disease outbreak can include:

• Fear and worry about your own health and the health of your loved ones.
• Changes in sleep or eating patterns.
• Difficulty sleeping or concentrating


Here are some ways you can help cope with this stress:
• Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
• Take care of your body
• Take deep breaths
• Stretch
• Eat healthy, well-balanced meals
• Exercise regularly
• Get plenty of sleep
• Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
• Talk with people you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.

Proper Handwashing Technique

May 22, 2020

Per the Center for Disease Control (CDC), hand hygiene is an important part of the U.S. response to the international emergence of COVID-19. Practicing hand hygiene, which includes the use of alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) or handwashing, is a simple yet effective way to prevent the spread of pathogens and infections in healthcare settings. CDC recommendations reflect this important role. Please refer to the handwashing diagram (below) provided by the World Health Organization to learn how to properly and most effectively wash your hands.

Slowing the Spread by Social Distancing

June 19, 2020

If you have read our previous articles, you know that Covid-19 spreads mainly among people who are in close contact with one another for a prolonged period of time. When an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks, droplets from their nose or mouth are scattered into the air and land in the mouths or noses of those they’re around. This is why it is important to maintain social distancing.

Social distancing means to keep space between yourself and others outside of your home. To practice social distancing, stay at least 6 feet away from others (two arm lengths apart).

Limiting close contact with others outside your household in indoor and outdoor spaces is one of the best tools we have to avoiding exposure to the virus and it will ultimately slow the spread of the virus and flatten the curve. Since people can spread the virus before they know they are even sick, it is important to stay away from others whenever possible; even if they are not presenting symptoms.

Many people have personal circumstances or situations that present challenges with practicing social distancing, but with each person who does practice proper social distancing, wears a fabric mask in everyday activities where social distancing is challenged, we can flatten the curve and get through this together.

Highlands & Covid-19

June 6, 2020

Please take a moment to hear about what we are doing to stop the spread, how our residents are doing, and what makes us different.


What You Should Know About Covid-19

May 8, 2020

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), Coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, is a new infectious disease. Most people that become infected with COVID-19 will experience mild or moderate systems that affect an individual’s respiratory system. Individuals that are at greater risk for severe systems of COVID-19 are those that are older in age and those that have underlying medical problems. Some individuals with COVID-19 may be asymptomatic. Asymptomatic is when an infected person shows no signs or symptoms of the disease.

We have been doing many things to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Taking the temperature of each Care Team Member as they arrive to the facility, providing each Care Team Member and resident with personal protective equipment (PPE), social distancing, proper hand washing, and educating everyone how to properly wear PPE that is being provided are ways in which we are preventing the spread of Covid-19 in our communities.

Symptoms of COVID-19 include:
• cough
• shortness of breath


Or at least 2 of these symptoms:
• fever
• chills
• repeated shaking with chills
• muscle pain


Our team is monitoring all residents for any sign or symptom of COVID-19. Once a concern arises, we are quarantining that individual and increasing our vital and wellness checks. With a physician’s order, we will then place a request for a test. Testing time can vary as it is dependent on the lab and availability of the test. Once a test result is received, any necessary next steps are taken.

In regards to the above information, isolation and quarantine are both used to help decrease the spread but are very different. Isolation is used to keep residents a part from one another. Meals, activities, therapy and other care are being provided in isolation in a Residents room. Quarantine, on the other hand, is used to place an individual that has been exposed to the infection away from other Residents.

During this time, visitation has been suspended for all family members, guests and other visitors. Only essential personnel is allowed in and out of the facility in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19. However, we understand the difficulty and impact this has on family, friends and residents. The facility is happy to arrange other opportunities to visit with residents. We are happy to help a resident with FaceTime, Zoom meetings, Facebook Messenger calls, and other media platforms as we have supplied each of our communities with iPads for this purpose. If you would like to schedule this type of communication, please call the facility and you will be directed to the appropriate Care Team Member. Once notified, we will help any resident with technology or with any adaptive equipment they may need. We are also happy to coordinate window visits and drive through parades to help lessen the strain of visitor restrictions. As always, we encourage notes and letters to be dropped off or sent.

For more information regarding COVID-19 please visit CDC.gov or http://www.coronavirus.in.gov and continue following our COVID-19 updates here.